Momentum

Conservation of Momentum

This is one of the most important principles in Billiards: The momentum that you give to the cue ball is shared between the cue ball and the object ball after impact.

How this works

  • If you hit the object ball full, you will transfer most of the momentum to it.
  • If you hit the object ball with a thin contact, the cue ball will keep most of the momentum.
  • At a little bit thinner than the true half-ball you share the momentum equally between the two balls.
Contact is normally more important than pace

A new skill for snooker players

Snooker players are not used to controlling the object ball (in snooker the aim is to make it disappear down a pocket). This is a difficult skill to master, but to control the balls you often need to concentrate more on contact than pace. For example, if you just graze the object ball, it does not matter how much pace is in the shot, the object ball will not move very far.

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Billiards TheoryFact

The aim-point to split the momentum equally between the cue ball and the object ball is a little bit thinner than the true half-ball and is 2.34mm outside the extreme edge of the object ball (almost exactly 3/32 inch). Here, the object ball deflection is 33°.

  • If you hit the object ball full, you will transfer most of the momentum to it.
  • If you hit the object ball with a thin contact, the cue ball will keep most of the momentum.
  • At a little bit thinner than the true half-ball you share the momentum equally between the two balls.